• Okro Soup Recipe | Ila Alasekpo | Otong Soup

    The Yorubas call it Ila Alasekpo, the Efiks call it Otong soup, Others might just call it okro with spinach. Once i posted the photo of the meal, lots of people asked for the recipe so here it is.

    Ingredients

    2cups of Okro

    Beef

    Dry Fish

    Honeycomb Tripe

    Cow Skin

    Cow foot

    2 cups of chopped spinach

    4 cubes of Maggi Cube

    2 tablespoon of salt

    1 tablespoon of dry pepper

    1 tablespoon of dry crayfish

    2 small scotch bonnet peppers *optional*

    a pinch of dry bitter leaves

    4 cups of water

    2 cooking spoons of palm oil

    Method

    Wash the beef, cow skin, cow foot and tripe and bring to boil with 3 cups of water, 1 tablespoon of salt, dry pepper, 2 cubes of maggi and boil till all types of meat are soft.

    Wash and chop the okro into small pieces.

    Add the rest of the seasoning, dry fish, bitter leaf and water and let it boil for about 5-7 minutes.

    Add the palm oil and let it simmer with the meat.

    Reduce the heat to medium and add the okro, stir in once but don’t cover the pot and reduce to low heat as covering the pot breaks the resilience of the okro. Let it simmer for another 5 minutes on low heat.

    Add the spinach and stir in and leave on for 2 minutes and food is ready.

    This can be served as a stand alone meal for people on low-calorie diets and can be served with Eba (Garri or cassava flakes), Pounded yam, semovita etc.

    okro soup_ otong soup

    okro and pounded yam_otong

     

    nigerian okro soup

    14 comments on “Okro Soup Recipe | Ila Alasekpo | Otong Soup”

    1. Pingback: Why Eating Okro is good for you? | Afrolems | Nigerian Food Recipes | Toronto Catering | African Recipes| Nigerian Food Blog

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    4. CoachRNC Reply

      Given that the word Okoro is an Igbo word I guess it is safe to assume that the origins of the soup owes a lot to Igbo Lands

    5. yemi Reply

      Typically, d Yoruba don’t put leaves in their “ila alasepo”. Its not bad, though

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    7. Pingback: Why Eating Okro is good for you? - Afrolems Nigerian Food Blog

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